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5-Star Review from Carol H.

Posted by on Apr 25, 2017 in Articles, Community | 0 comments

5-Star Review from Carol H.

“So happy I found Dr. Blagoev-can’t find enough words to express how pleased I am with Doctor’s expertise and gentle manner-she is a perfectionist and the nicest staff one could imagine. Lovely office makes waiting a pleasure and appointments are flexible with very little waiting.” –Carol...

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Many Smiles a Day Keep the Doctor Away

Posted by on Apr 25, 2017 in Articles, Community | 0 comments

Many Smiles a Day Keep the Doctor Away

I met a woman, who came to my dental office. This lady left an impression on me because she looked unhappy. I found out she had learned to refrain from smiling for a long time because of missing teeth. This habit never went away. She took my advice to start treatment. And in just a month, she looked years younger — she became more relaxed and confident to smile again. I know too many people who have lived hiding their smiles. Here is an affordable treatment plan for missing teeth. http://smarturl.it/mb-implant Hiding one’s smile will be a thing of the past. Please help my office to share this post so that more people can take advantage of this special: http://smarturl.it/mb-implant...

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Helping Children Cope with Anxiety During Dental Visits

Posted by on Aug 29, 2016 in Articles | 0 comments

Helping Children Cope with Anxiety During Dental Visits

Watching Cartoons During Dental Treatment May Help Children Cope With Anxiety, Trial Finds. A release on Science Daily (8/8) stated that “watching cartoons through video glasses during dental treatment could help lessen children’s anxiety and distress as well as reduce disruptive behavior,” according to a randomized controlled clinical trial published in Acta Odontologia Scandinavica. In the study, researchers “randomly assigned” 56 children to receive audiovisual distraction or no distraction, finding “the children in the distraction group exhibited significantly less anxiety and showed more cooperation than those in the control group, particularly during the local anesthetic injection.” In addition, children in the distraction group had a significantly lower average pulse rate during the injection than children in the control group. However, the children “did not report differences in treatment-related pain and anxiety.” The authors concluded the audiovisual distraction appears to be “a useful technique to calm children and ensure that they can be given the dental treatment they need,” although larger studies are needed to confirm this finding. For more information on coping with dental anxiety and tips on bringing children to the dentist, please visit MouthHealthy.org. Click here to make an appointment with Dr. Mariana Blagoev for your child...

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The Dangers of Gum Disease

Posted by on Aug 27, 2016 in Articles | 0 comments

The Dangers of Gum Disease

Patients With Gum Disease May Be More Likely To Suffer Heart Attack, Stroke, Severe Chest Pain, Study Indicates. Reuters (8/23, Crist) reports that “a study of more than 60,000 dental patients” indicated that “those with gum disease were twice as likely to have had a heart attack, stroke or severe chest pain.” Researchers found that “even after taking other risk factors for cardiovascular disease into account, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and smoking,” individuals “with periodontal disease were still 59 percent more likely to have a history of heart problems.” The findings were published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. Don’t let gum disease affect your overall health! Click here to schedule an appointment with Dr. Mariana Blagoev...

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Baby’s First Dental Visit

Posted by on Aug 25, 2016 in Articles | 0 comments

Baby’s First Dental Visit

Your baby is hitting new milestones every day, and his or her first dental visit is another one to include in the baby book! Your child’s first dental visit should take place after that first tooth appears, but no later than the first birthday. Why so early? As soon as your baby has teeth, he or she can get cavities. Being proactive about your child’s dental health today can help keep his or her smile healthy for life. How to Prepare Start early! To get your child ready for the visit, talk to him or her about what’s going to happen and be positive. Have your child practice opening his or her mouth to get them ready for when the dentist counts and checks their teeth. Reading books or watching videos about first dental visits may help your child be less fearful and more confident. Moms and dads can prepare, too. When making the appointment, it can’t hurt to ask for any necessary patient forms ahead of time. It may be quicker and easier for you to fill them out at home instead of at the office on the day of your visit. Make a list of questions, as well. If your child is teething, sucking his or her thumb or using a pacifier too much, your dentist can offer some advice. What to Expect During the Visit The dentist will examine your child to make sure their jaw and teeth are developing in the way they should. During the visit, you will be seated in the dental chair with your child on your lap if your child isn’t able to — or doesn’t want to — sit in the chair alone. The dentist will check for mouth injuries, cavities or other issues. Once that part of the exam is over, the dentist will clean your child’s teeth and give you tips for daily care. If your child cries a little or wiggles during the exam, don’t worry. It’s normal, and your dental team understands this is a new experience for your child! Tips for a Great Visit Don’t schedule an appointment during naptime. Instead, pick a time your child is usually well-rested and cooperative. Make sure your child has had a light meal and brushes their teeth before their appointment so they won’t be hungry during their visit. Save snacks for after the visit so they aren’t on your child’s teeth during the exam. Think of the appointment as a happy and fun experience. If your child becomes upset during the visit, work with your dentist to calm your child. You’re on the same team! The above article is from Mouth Healthy and can be found at the ADA website or by clicking...

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3 Things All Athletes Should Do for Their Teeth

Posted by on Apr 23, 2016 in Articles | 0 comments

3 Things All Athletes Should Do for Their Teeth

Dentist Dr. Thomas Long has seen firsthand what can happen when “the puck stops here.” In addition to seeing everyday athletes in his private practice, Dr. Long (a former college hockey player himself) is the team dentist for the National Hockey League’s Carolina Hurricanes. No matter what sport or skill level, Dr. Long says athletes need to take care of their teeth both on and off the field. “Most athletes are careful about what they eat and their workout routine. Part of that routine should include taking care of your mouth and teeth every single day,” he says. “It would be a shame to miss practice or a game because you are in the dentist’s office receiving treatment or recovering from a dental surgical procedure.” Here, Dr. Long shares his playbook for a healthy mouth. Make a Mouthguard Part of Your Uniform Helmet? Check. Knee pads? Check. Mouthguard? Check! A mouthguard needs to be part of your uniform in every sport. Mouthguards usually cover your upper teeth and protect your teeth, lips, tongue, face and jaw against injuries. Wearing a mouthguard regularly becomes second nature. It does not matter what type of mouthguard you choose, just make sure it fits properly. “The athletes I see feel better when they start wearing them, and they feel a little naked without them after they get used to them,” Dr. Long says In fact, many sports won’t let you play without one. Dr. Long says USA Hockey requires all youth players to wear a mouthguard. “The referees have to be able to see it, and it has to be colored,” he says. “I think that’s a great idea.” Sideline Sugary Sports Drinks If you need to quench your thirst, reach for water instead of a sports drink. “People are trying to rehydrate, but there may be a lot of sugar in those drinks,” Dr. Long says. The bacteria in your mouth will use the sugar from your sports drink to produce an acid that weakens the hard outer shell of your teeth, which may increase your risk for cavities over time. In his experience with the Hurricanes, Dr. Long says he doesn’t often see professional athletes drinking sports drinks. “Their diets are so well-managed they just don’t have a lot of sugar,” he says. “They make their own sports drinks, and they’re more high-protein shakes than sugary sports drinks.” Brush, Floss, Rinse, Repeat Practice makes perfect when you’re mastering the skills of any sport, so do the same with your daily dental habits. Dr. Long says an unhealthy tooth is more likely to be damaged if a sports injury happens. “A tooth that has had a lot of decay and a lot of fillings is nowhere near as strong as a tooth that has not had decay and has not had a lot of fillings,” he says. Keep your smile strong by brushing twice a day for two minutes and flossing once a day. Then, in the home stretch of your daily dental routine, use an...

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